An IoT systems integrator’s approach to IoT pilots

One of the most interesting presentations at the IoT for Manufacturing workshop at Georgia Tech was from Polytron, a systems integrator specializing in manufacturing. While the focus of the presentation was the resurgence of RFID on the shop floor, there were several other takeaways shared by the company concerning planning IoT deployments for clients. And, it offers hope for those who are alarmed by the IoT “pilot purgatory” trend pervasive throughout industry.

Polytron IoT systems integrator presentation IoTfM18

Polytron’s Richard W. Phillips said that one of the first steps for the systems integrator when brought into an IoT engagement involves asking clients to identify business drivers. When it comes to IoT pilots, the company wants to identify ROI opportunities.

Fortunately, there are lots of low-hanging fruit – typically Polytron and the client might discuss 10 or 20 potential projects, which could be anything from setting up alerts to going paperless for some process on the plant floor. The team will then get to work on one pilot before considering scaling or expanding to other areas.

Phillips said, “Ideally, we minimize the number of technologies without giving up functionality,” and consider a 10-year timeframe for the implementation. He added that when it comes to new projects, it’s not just a matter of figuring out the best technology. “We try to understand impact of new technologies on people and processes,” he said. “Will workers be motivated?”

Another Polytron employee described a case study involving a beverage manufacturer seeking to launch a new product line. Even something that sounds simple (the launch of a new health drink made with vegetable juice) can get very complex from an IoT manufacturing perspective. Factors that have to be considered include:

  • Tracking ingredients with different expiry dates
  • Batching and packaging
  • Pasteurization
  • Handling recalls
  • Recipe management
  • Data collection for FDA compliance.

Polytron said the solution that the client ended up using involved location and data tracking using RFID tags on palettes of vegetables moving around the plant, along with RFID labels on cases of bottles leaving the facility.

This is an excerpt from Priority Payload Report.

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